Daoud

The Mendiant, Unraveller of Deceptions
Hero-God of Humility, Clarity, and Immediacy

Symbol: A multi-colored patch of cloth or tangle of yarn, with seven threads depending from the bottom, one for each distinct color of the spectrum
Home Plane:
Alignment: Neutral
Portfolio: Humility, Clarity, Immediacy
Worshipers: Baklunish
Cleric Alignments:
Domains: Magic, Travel.
Favored Weapon: Quarterstaff

Special Notes: Divine spellcasters are expected to abandon all claims to wealth and social status. This means that they cannot accept any titles or benefits that improve their social status, and they cannot pay for or accept any lifestyle above adventurer’s standard; repeated violations of these restrictions is considered a gross violation of the code of conduct. A divine spellcaster of Daoud should strive to exemplify their deity’s teachings on abandoning wealth and greed. Whenever they have 1,000 gp or less in non-item wealth (the value in the Final GP Total box on their last AR), they receive a +1 sacred bonus to all Charisma and Wisdom-based skill checks. If they have more than 1,000 gp (plus 500 gp per character level) in non-item wealth, they receive a -1 sacred penalty to such checks instead. This penalty can be avoided by designating some of the non-item wealth beyond the 1,000 gp plus 500 gp per character level limit as being used towards a future purchase (or Magic Item Creation) of an item the divine spellcaster already has access to purchase (or craft). List the amount being dedicated to an item purchase (or Magic Item Creation) in the notes section; that gold can no longer be used for anything other than the future purchase (or Magic Item Creation) of that item (or on NPC spellcasting of spells that cure hp damage, remove a condition/curse, or bring an individual back from the dead, if, and only if, the spellcasting can not be paid for otherwise). If the remaining non-item wealth left is at or below the limit, the penalty no longer applies.

Description: Daoud (dah-OOD) began life as the son of a noble Baklunish family of great wealth who were exemplars of those virtues known as the Four Feet of the Dragon (honor, family, generosity, and piety). In his early life he found prosperity and acclaim, until he became the philosopher-pasha of Tusmit. Yet, in his middle years, he was reduced to beggary, stripped of all titles and treasures by the callous hand of fate. Where once he had been celebrated, now he was despised. Exiled from his homeland, he lived as a mendicant priest of Istus and contemplated the harshness of his mistress. As he regarded his drastic change in fortune, Daoud realized that the Four Feet of the Dragon represented a vulgar philosophy. He saw piety as mere affectation and obsession with honor as arrogance, while generosity and devotion to family were little more than matters of social hygiene. In place of these superficial values he put honesty, humility, poverty and endurance, and called this philosophy the Path of the Seeker. Daoud appears as an old man with leathery skin and dark, heavy brows, beneath which shine piercing black eyes. He most often wears the simple clothing of a mountain shepherd, with a well-worn turban on his head and a heavy staff in his hand. His symbol is a multicolored patch of cloth or tangle of yarn, with seven threads depending from the bottom – one for each distinct color of the spectrum. “Seek the boundaries of fortune, good and bad, for there the threads of destiny are exposed. Never desire more than fate provides and never accept less than fate demands. A fabric of lies must be cut with sharp words.” Clerics of Daoud abandon all claims to wealth and social status. Often brutally honest, they have no respect for position. So long as they accept their own fate and follow the path their founder walked before them, they are able to affect the situation of those they encounter. The mighty have been made weak, the downtrodden have been exalted, destinies have been altered, and whole tribes have been scattered by a humble Daoudah’s tug at the strands of fate.

Daoud (dah-OOD) began life as the son of a noble Baklunish family of great wealth and reputation who were exemplars of those virtues known as the Four Feet of the Dragon (honor, family, generosity, and piety). In his early life he found prosperity and acclaim, until he became the philosopher-pasha of Tusmit. Yet, in his middle years, he was reduced to beggary, stripped of all titles and treasures by the callous hand of fate. Where once he had been celebrated, now he was despised. Exiled from his homeland, he Jived as a mendicant priest of lstus and contemplated the harshness of his mistress.

As he regarded his drastic change in fortune, Daoud realized that the Four Feet of the Dragon represented a vulgar philosophy. He saw piety as mere affectation and obsession with honor as arrogance, while generosity and devotion to family were little more than matters of social hygiene. In place of these superficial values he put honesty, humility, poverty and endurance, and called this philosophy the Path of the Secker.

Daoud appears as an old man with leathery skin and dark, heavy brows, beneath which shine piercing black eyes. He most often wears the simple clothing of a mountain shepherd. with a well-worn turban on his head and a heavy staff in his hand. His symbol is a multi-colored patch of cloth or tangle of yarn, with seven threads depending from the bottom – one for each distinct color of the spectrum.

Seek the boundaries of fortune, good and bad, for there the threads of destiny are exposed. Never desire more than fate provides and never accept less than fate demands. A fabric of lies must be cut with sharp words.

Clerics of Daoud abandon all claims to wealth and social status. Often brutally honest. they have no respect for position. So Jong as they accept their own fate and follow the path their founder walked before them, they arc able to affect the situation of those they encounter. The mighty have been made weak. the downtrodden have been exalted. destinies have been altered, and whole tribes have been scattered by a humble Daoudah’s tug at the strands of fate.

Domains Magic. Travel:
Weapon quarterstaff.

Gods of the Flanaess

Daoud

Greyhawk Samaryllis Samaryllis